What to Do When You Can’t Focus at Work

It’s already a given that Singaporeans are hard workers. But there will always be those times when you just can’t focus on the task at hand. Now, there may be a lot of reasons for this. And fortunately, there are also many things you can do to get rid of the problem. Here are only some of them.

Take a short rest

One of the main reasons you can’t focus on your work is because you’re simply too tired already. When your brain is exhausted, it’s already obvious that your concentration will be impaired as well. In general, the best thing you can do is to get enough sleep every night. When you do this, you’ll feel refreshed each day and you won’t get tired easily. If you feel tired at work, you should take a few short minutes for a break instead of drinking coffee and continuing your work. Maybe you can walk around and just have a change of scenery for a few.

Break down the task to make it easier

Another reason why you can’t focus on your work is if it’s too big of a task. The easiest (and probably most logical) thing you can do, in this case, is to break it down to smaller tasks. If the task is too big, it might seem out of reach and you may think that you won’t be able to finish it. That, in turn, will make you lose focus on finishing it. By breaking it down and setting smaller goals first, you can make things easier for yourself. You might not notice that you’re slowly but surely getting things done when you finish each small goal first.

Stop for a second and see if you’re multitasking

When you are multitasking, you get the feeling that you’re focused on work and that you’re already doing a lot. But it usually doesn’t end up like this. Multitasking drastically reduces your focus because you’re paying attention to too many things at once. So, when you have a lot of things on your hand but you still can’t get your focus back up, take a step back even just for a second. If you notice that it’s because you’re multitasking, drop other unimportant things and focus on one task first!

Think of the consequences

If you start losing focus, it’s likely that you’ll start procrastinating. If you do start procrastinating though, one thing you can do is to think of the consequences if you don’t do your work. It would be even better if you could imagine the worst-case scenario if you delay your work even more. Though this might sound Spartan-like and harsh on yourself, it can be a good way to bring your concentration back.


9 Things to Remember When Caring for a Trailing Jade

The trailing jade plant (Peperomia rotundifolia) is perfect for newbie gardeners because it is easy to grow. However, even if it shares the same name as the jade plant, the trailing jade has different care requirements that you must meet.

The trailing jade is an epiphyte. The term simply means that it attaches itself on trees, rocks, rotten logs, and even the forest ground. That description should tell you that you can grow it in a pot with soil, but you will get better results by recreating its natural habitat.

The trailing jade can produce flowers. Most gardeners prize this succulent’s trailing stems and leaves, but they are also capable of producing flowers on the spikes given the right conditions. The trails make them ideal for placing near windowsills or in hanging baskets. The stems can grow up to 30 cm in length, so they do not really take up a lot of space.

Use a peat-based soil. If you want to use a soil mix, choose a peat-based soil which contains perlite or sand and peat (1:2). This allows for adequate drainage and aeration of the soil. If you want to re-pot the trailing jade, you can change only the top soil once a year. Do not move the plant unless it looks like it is outgrowing the container.

Give it something to climb on. As a vine, it should have a support structure to grow around. Use a trellis, arbor, or pergola to showcase its beauty.

Keep the trailing jade away from the cold. If grown outdoors in Singapore, the trailing jade will have no issues, but if you want to place this indoors, make sure that there are no drastic changes in the temperature. Anything below 10°C in an air-conditioned room is bad for the trailing jade, which is native to tropical forests in South America. Ideal temperatures are between 18°C to 24°C.

The trailing hade needs bright indirect lights. This plant grows under the shade of tall trees in its natural habitat, so it is only natural to provide it with the same conditions at home. Morning light is fine, but it should be protected during the hottest times of the day. If you notice the leaves look scorched, you need to move the plant elsewhere. However, spray the leaves regularly to keep high humidity.

Do not over-water the trailing jade. It is a succulent, so it means it is good in storing water, but it has small roots. Wait until the soil is dry before watering the trailing jade. In fact, it is better if you water it sparingly than regularly.

Fertilize the trailing jade occasionally. If the plant looks healthy, there is no need to use a fertilizer, but if you must, use a diluted liquid fertilizer once a month.

You need to prune the trailing jade. To keep it in good shape, pinch the stems on the overgrowths. You can even use the stem tips and leaf cuttings to propagate the trailing jade. Tie the stems loosely to keep to the shape of the structure supporting it.


Go-To Hike Trails in Singapore

For a country known for its incredible buildings and urban city life, Singapore actually puts a highlight on its natural attractions as well. That being said, one of the best ways to see the scenic nature is through hike trails. One way or another, these hike trails are also places you shouldn’t miss. The picturesque views invite both locals and tourists alike, whether for early morning jogs or just to bask in the beauty of nature. So, without further ado, here are some of the best hike trails to go to in Singapore.

1. Bukit Timah Nature Reserve

The Bukit Timah Nature Reserve is one of the many hike trails in Singapore known for the richness in plantlife and wildlife. It also has the tallest hill in Singapore. This is why the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve is more ideal for those who like to walk around in nature. Another reason why it’s one of the best to go to is that there are four different trails you can take. One takes you directly to the peak of the hill while the other tree accounts for the scenic views around the nature reserve.

2. Hindhede Nature Park

Right next to the Bukit Timah Nature Park is the Hindhede Nature Park which also has equally great hike trails. The trails here are actually easier to traverse which makes it great for beginners and leisure hiking with kids. This location also houses a variety of animal species so it will be very much worth it take stops and look around. There’s also the incredible Hindhede Quarry towards the end of the park.

3. TreeTop

The TreeTop Walk located at the MacRitchie Reservoir is already a pretty popular hike trail even though it’s also a pretty hard climb. Though there are steep slopes and most of the path is wavy, you’ll find it very much worth the time and effort once you reach the top. At the top of the trail, there’s a long suspension bridge that gives you a view of the whole forest. Again, this is a fairly hard trail for complete beginners, so make sure you have enough water and that you’re fully prepared to make the hike.

4. Pulau Ubin

The Pulau Ubin hike trail is probably one of the best places to go to if you really want to take a break from the city life. This granite island has almost everything that nature lovers look for. There’s an abundance of wildlife, there’s rich greenery, and an overall picturesque view of the island. In addition to that, there’s also a coastal boardwalk which you simply won’t see in many other trails. Another great think about the Pulau Ubin trail is that you can go around in bikes if you get too tired walking!


Making Conversations in Singapore

There is a perfect time and place for everything and despite your innocent intentions of making a new friend or at least a new acquaintance, it might not go so well if you don’t do it right. The western and the Asian style of dating are naturally very different but Singapore on the other hand cannot be categorized as any of these two. The dating game is constantly changing as culture is changing and it is only natural that we adapt to the changes around us to survive.

Here are a few ways to make your approach to Singaporeans a little more effective.

1. Time, place, and person

As the starting of the article says, there is a time and place for everything and this specifically means that there are places wherein interaction just doesn’t work no matter how hard you want it. Like for example, trying to start a conversation at the MRT station at six in the morning would be a terrible idea as everyone is busy getting to work and instead of being able to make a friend.

You might get the cold shoulder or another type of negative response. Approaching people at a social place like a bar or maybe even a park after hours increases your chance of making a friend just because you are inserting yourself when they are unoccupied and available.

2. Friendly but structured

Being friendly is always a good idea but being a bit too friendly might make you come off as a bit of a creep and frankly nobody wants that. Being friendly but structured means that your conversation should be entertaining but your intentions should be clear.

Of course do not come off too hard as it might just give off the creepy vibe even more. Starting with a basic “hi” then later on going to the introduction then making your motive clear that you want to make a friend is a great idea to build a connection as Singaporeans aren’t that big of a fan of overly casual conversations

3. Etiquette

Becoming a friend is quite simple as long as you do not try to push any boundaries and Singaporeans tend to have this sort of conduct wherein it is okay to say this and not okay to say that. Making sure that you keep yourself respectful, polite, but also entertaining is the best way to go. You can always have a little fun as long as you don’t step over any boundaries.

Making a friend in Singapore isn’t that hard if you direct your efforts in the right path. Who knows, you might make a great friend in Singapore today.


How Avoiding Multitasking Can Affect Your Productivity

It’s become hard to notice but, in this time and age, we multitask almost all the time. We look at our phones while walking, we listen to music while doing work, and sometimes we even do more than two things at once. Though many people say that multitasking helps them get their work done, it’s not necessarily the same for everyone. In fact, multitasking can affect our productivity negatively even. Here’s how:

 

Multitasking makes us more stressed

Every time you’ll have to multitask at work, you’re already putting yourself under stress. You’re going around here and there, doing this and that, and everything just becomes hectic. Think about it the next time you’re about to do it and see the difference between multitasking and not multitasking. You’ll see that you’re less stressed when you don’t have to do a lot of things at once.

Multitasking leads you to make more mistakes

Naturally, you will make mistakes because your focus is divided. Doing multiple tasks at once will obviously take a toll on your mind. For example, let’s say for some wild reason, you’re doing two projects at one time. Now, you have information you plan to put on one project but you put it on the other. You don’t notice it because your attention is already foggy. This is just one of the many crucial mistakes that can happen when you do too many things at once.

Multitasking gets in the way of your progress

With the two points mentioned above, you can easily see that multitasking significantly affects your progress negatively. For one, you become more stressed with your work. It will then become easier to experience more burnout or even lose motivation as a whole. You’ll also have to waste more time trying to fix the mistakes you make because of multitasking.

Multitasking can affect our brainpower

It’s been found that multitasking can also be damaging to our memory. For instance, while you’re on the way to work, you plan to pick up some food. But then, later on, you forget to do it because you were walking while looking at your phone the whole time. This sounds too simple but it’s small things like this that build up sooner or later. Our short-term memory is also affected when we’re focused on something, and then suddenly act on something else.

Our brains do not want us to multitask

Why? Because our minds are not made to multitask, that’s simply the case. Although our minds are great in almost all aspects, it’s still not recommended that we keep multitasking. If you’ve noticed, we even sometimes have difficulty focusing on just one task, how much more with two or three.


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